Brandon Dillon's Blog

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Archive for the ‘Faith’ Category

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted by Brandon Dillon on November 28, 2013

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.

Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. In March, the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian who greeted them in English. Several days later, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event, and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

 

Thanksgiving Becomes an Official Holiday

Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year’s harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well. During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies.
In 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians. Abraham Lincoln finally heeded her request in 1863, at the height of the Civil War, in a proclamation entreating all Americans to ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.” He scheduled Thanksgiving for the final Thursday in November, and it was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. Roosevelt’s plan, known derisively as Franksgiving, was met with passionate opposition, and in 1941 the president reluctantly signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

Thanksgiving Traditions

In many American households, the Thanksgiving celebration has lost much of its original religious significance; instead, it now centers on cooking and sharing a bountiful meal with family and friends. Turkey, a Thanksgiving staple so ubiquitous it has become all but synonymous with the holiday, may or may not have been on offer when the Pilgrims hosted the inaugural feast in 1621. Today, however, nearly 90 percent of Americans eat the bird—whether roasted, baked or deep-fried—on Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Other traditional foods include stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. Volunteering is a common Thanksgiving Day activity, and communities often hold food drives and host free dinners for the less fortunate.
Parades have also become an integral part of the holiday in cities and towns across the United States. Presented by Macy’s department store since 1924, New York City’s Thanksgiving Day parade is the largest and most famous, attracting some 2 to 3 million spectators along its 2.5-mile route and drawing an enormous television audience. It typically features marching bands, performers, elaborate floats conveying various celebrities and giant balloons shaped like cartoon characters.
Beginning in the mid-20th century and perhaps even earlier, the president of the United States has “pardoned” one or two Thanksgiving turkeys each year, sparing the birds from slaughter and sending them to a farm for retirement. A number of U.S. governors also perform the annual turkey pardoning ritual.

Thanksgiving Controversies

For some scholars, the jury is still out on whether the feast at Plymouth really constituted the first Thanksgiving in the United States. Indeed, historians have recorded other ceremonies of thanks among European settlers in North America that predate the Pilgrims’ celebration. In 1565, for instance, the Spanish explorer Pedro Menéndez de Avilé invited members of the local Timucua tribe to a dinner in St. Augustine, Florida, after holding a mass to thank God for his crew’s safe arrival. On December 4, 1619, when 38 British settlers reached a site known as Berkeley Hundred on the banks of Virginia’s James River, they read a proclamation designating the date as “a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God.”
Some Native Americans and others take issue with how the Thanksgiving story is presented to the American public, and especially to schoolchildren. In their view, the traditional narrative paints a deceptively sunny portrait of relations between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag people, masking the long and bloody history of conflict between Native Americans and European settlers that resulted in the deaths of millions. Since 1970, protesters have gathered on the day designated as Thanksgiving at the top of Cole’s Hill, which overlooks Plymouth Rock, to commemorate a “National Day of Mourning.” Similar events are held in other parts of the country.

Thanksgiving’s Ancient Origins

Although the American concept of Thanksgiving developed in the colonies of New England, its roots can be traced back to the other side of the Atlantic. Both the Separatists who came over on the Mayflower and the Puritans who arrived soon after brought with them a tradition of providential holidays—days of fasting during difficult or pivotal moments and days of feasting and celebration to thank God in times of plenty.
As an annual celebration of the harvest and its bounty, moreover, Thanksgiving falls under a category of festivals that spans cultures, continents and millennia. In ancient times, the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans feasted and paid tribute to their gods after the fall harvest. Thanksgiving also bears a resemblance to the ancient Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot. Finally, historians have noted that Native Americans had a rich tradition of commemorating the fall harvest with feasting and merrymaking long before Europeans set foot on their shores.

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There are good people out there.

Posted by Brandon Dillon on September 15, 2013

Two weeks ago I was feeling better from all the sick people around me bombarding my immune system from the cold, flue, pneumonia that I was feeling up for one of my usual weekend rides along the cost from Oceanside CA down past Carlsbad. Friday night I noticed my tire off my bike was flat, from sitting in the house for a week, I thought that was odd but I went to this great bike shop in Oceanside called Omega Bikes http://www.omegabicycles.com/ (they are closed on Sundays for Church! how awesome is that! They list that on the open sign)

So I went in first thing Saturday morning at 10 am and got a new tube, I was up at 7 so I Was ready to go for a ride immediately,  So I parked at the free public parking at the Oceanside Pier (yes free parking at a beach!)  and got on the bike and started riding south. Well after about 7.5 miles and about 3 miles from anything but houses and open area along the coast highway I got a flat on the front tire I just got replaced. So I was like well it happens, lets get back and get it fixed. I wanted to chill on the beach and do some swimming in the ocean too that day.

So I thought it would be an awesome idea since I wear cycling shoes to take those off and just walk barefoot, cuz it wont be that far and I Can get it fixed in down town Carlsbad, ya that’s 3 miles away. So after a mile barefoot walking on cement I decided to put my cycling shoes on lol. Then after another mile my feet started to burn and hurt, the next mile I thought I was going to die. So I took the bike path down to the Carlsbad coaster train to see if I can get on the train to ride home but the next one was in 3 hours!

so I called a bike shop that I found on my Windows 8 phone that was like a mile away to see if they had pick up service and could do a tube for me, and they couldn’t even change a tube for me today let alone pick me up =(

So I walked from the Station up the road a block to the Surf Shack

I asked the guy behind the counter if he had a tube which he did for beach cruisers but not my road bike, so we filled up the tire to see if it would hold air at all so I Could ride the 3 more miles to my car but it wasn’t holding air. So this girl who was in the shop looking around who’s named I found out later to be Chrystal said.

“I’ll give you a ride back I live right by there.”

I declined at first, not sure why but she said it a few times so I accepted her offer. We went to put my bike in her Escape and I met her 4 year old daughter Dainica and her boy friend Kevin who;s family owns the Carlsbad Alkaline water artesian mineral well which was across the street from the surf shop

http://www.carlsbadalkalinewater.com

it was really amazing to meet some great people that helped me out in a big way, the next day my feet were blistered up good, had I walked another 3 miles I Can only imagine how bad they would have been. It took a few days of careful walking but by Thursday I was back to normal and rode the following weekend and saw Chrystal and Kevin running along the path I bike on.

And the water is great!

Carlsbad WellWP_20130831_002

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2012 in review

Posted by Brandon Dillon on January 1, 2013

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner can carry about 250 passengers. This blog was viewed about 1,100 times in 2012. If it were a Dreamliner, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Where Was God? Connecticut shooting.

Posted by Brandon Dillon on December 17, 2012

I find the event that happened in Connecticut very bad and wrong. and my prayers go out to those families and teachers who gave their lives. I wanted to share what Mike Huckabee had to say and I think its 100 right on and no more needs to be said but much more needs to be done. But its not passing laws, its just teaching the laws that God gave us. here is it please give it a watch and let me know how you feel.

God Bless the children and parents.

 

 

 

 

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Oliver DeMille 1913

Posted by Brandon Dillon on July 28, 2012

I just got my hands on the newly released book by best selling author, founder of George Wythe University, Patriot, and a true American and sensus plenior thinker Oliver DeMille.
As I finish this book which tells us why the U.S. Is in its current state of decline and what set it all off back 100 years ago and what you and I can do to change it.
So far this book is amazing and I am only on chapter 4 since yesterday, I just can’t put it down and if you care about freedom and what happens to the next generation you won’t be able to put it down either

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Mental Fitness Challenge Week 1!

Posted by Brandon Dillon on May 6, 2012

Well week one is in the bag for the Mental fitness challenge, and I have to say its amazing! Orrin’s latest book Resolved 13 resolutions for life is truly a hand book for you life. Orrin didn’t write another book juts to pad his wallet, he said he wrote Resolved because if  he died tomorrow what would he have wanted his children to know and how to live their lives. Amazing!

Not only will this 90 Mental Fitness Challenge help you live the life you’ve always wanted by helping identify areas in life that your great at right now and the others that need some work, we can help provide the help needed though an amazing community support around the world and products to help you in every one of the 13 areas, from subscription based products which is the best way humans learn, little bits at a time over a longer period of time, that’s why the mass media and TV play those visual images to program your subconscious, but now you can choose to program it with things that will help you and not them. Specialized packs like our finance pack and marriage pack, and parenting packs and many more.

I am just super excited to keep doing the 90 Day Mental Fitness Challenge my self and help others do the same, the cost is so cheap for a product of this quality, 220 bucks! Plus if you get 3 people to join ya in living the life you’ve always wanted you get your 220 back! how can you not like that! The same goes for any of the subscriptions as well!! So if your not interested in making money (but seriously who doesn’t want more money?) as customers you can get yours entirely free!!

Here is a link to more info and I am looking for some more Challenge & Accountability partners so join me and lets have some fun!

http://www.the-team.biz/39862710/Home.aspx

 

Here is a great video too help ya understand how big this is!

 

http://www.mental-fitness-challenge.com/Home.aspx?ln=61235267

Mental Fitness Challenge

 

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The life you always wanted to live.

Posted by Brandon Dillon on April 29, 2012

Mental Fitness Challenge

This weekend in Columbus Team and Life launched the ground breaking Mental Fitness Challenge to help you live the life you’ve always wanted to live though principles called resolutions. These resolutions are written in detail in Orrin Woodward’s new book called 13 Resolutions for Life in which he has studied 3 very important people in history, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin & Jonathan Edwards. What he found is that the accomplishments these gentleman had were the results of resolutions applied over their lifetime. Just think about it, what would we have today if Benjamin Franklin didn’t resolve to change and come up with his 13 virtue’s? For sure there would be no USA. I don’t want to go in to all the detail here but I am starting the challenge this week and I highly suggest you do the same, I am looking for partners that I can be accountable to and get feed back from that are going to join me on the journey of living the life they’ve always wanted. So lets go! I can help ya do it. Check this video out!

During the next 13 weeks I will be reading the 3 books and listening to the audios in the pack and working with other people who are already committed to doing this with me so they can get their life that they always wanted to live so each week at least once I will be updating you on the books chapters and things I did that week.

See you all in the challenge!

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A Message To Garcia

Posted by Brandon Dillon on March 24, 2012

I was listening to a CD by Bill Lewis today and he was talking about this I felt compelled to do my best to let people know about this amazing work. in 1899 after a dinner with family the question was asked who was the most important person in winning the Spanish American war and this Essay was born.  So many people orded extra copys of this because of its important tale of persistance, morals and many other things.

I dont want to spoil the reading but so many copies were reprinted and orderd that it became the most read item next to the Bible.

Thats impressive!! and Alot! Still nothing has been out read over the bible or printed but that’s another post =)

Enjoy and share this with everyone! it was a big deal then and has been lost in the past 50 years or so of our poor educatiion system.

 

 

 

 

A Message To Garcia

From An American Original

For the March 1899 issue of The Philistine, Elbert Hubbard dashed off an untitled essay to fill space. The inspirational homily on duty caused a sensation. Reprinted in special edition pamphlets and as a book with the title A Message to Garcia, Hubbard estimated some 40 million copies to be in circulation by 1913. Sales figures were enhanced by American businesses purchasing bulk supplies to distribute to their employees. It was translated in many languages and distributed worldwide. Elbert Hubbard II, credited by his father for inspiring the essay, estimated the number of copies printed to be near 80 million by 1936.

Below is the text from a 1914 Roycroft edition. It includes Hubbard’s explanation of the essay’s genesis and a brief account of its international success.

A MESSAGE TO GARCIA

Being a Preachment by Elbert Hubbard

Done into a Printed Book by the Roycrofters at Their Shop, Which is in East Aurora, Erie County, N.Y. Copyright 1914 by Elbert Hubbard

APOLOGIA

HORSE SENSE

If you work for a man, in Heaven’s name work for him. If he pays wages that supply you your bread and butter, work for him, speak well of him, think well of him, and stand by him, and stand by the institution he represents. I think if I worked for a man, I would work for him. I would not work for him a part of his time, but all of his time. I would give an undivided service or none. If put to the pinch, an ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness. If you must vilify, condemn, and eternally disparage, why, resign your position, and when you are outside, damn to your heart’s content. But, I pray you, so long as you are a part of an institution, do not condemn it. Not that you will injure the institution–not that–but when you disparage the concern of which you are a part, you disparage yourself. And don’t forget–“I forgot” won’t do in business.

This literary trifle, “A Message to Garcia,” was written one evening after supper, in a single hour. It was on the Twenty-second of February, Eighteen Hundred Ninety-nine, Washington’s Birthday, and we were just going to press with the March “Philistine.” The thing leaped hot from my heart, written after a trying day, when I had been endeavoring to train some rather delinquent villagers to abjure the comatose state and get radio-active.

The immediate suggestion, though, came from a little argument over the teacups, when my boy Bert suggested that Rowan was the real hero of the Cuban War. Rowan had gone alone and done the thing–carried the message to Garcia.

It came to me like a flash! Yes, the boy is right, the hero is the man who does his work–who carries the message to Garcia. I got up from the table, and wrote “A Message to Garcia.” I thought so little of it that we ran it in the Magazine without a heading. The edition went out, and soon orders began to come for extra copies of the March “Philistine,” a dozen, fifty, a hundred; and when the American News Company ordered a thousand, I asked one of my helpers which article it was that had stirred up the cosmic dust.

“It’s the stuff about Garcia,” he said.

The next day a telegram came from George H. Daniels, of the New York Central Railroad, thus: “Give price on one hundred thousand Rowan article in pamphlet form–Empire State Express advertisement on back–also how soon can ship.”

I replied giving price, and stated we could supply the pamphlets in two years. Our facilities were small and a hundred thousand booklets looked like an awful undertaking.

The result was that I gave Mr. Daniels permission to reprint the article in his own way. He issued it in booklet form in editions of half a million. Two or three of these half-million lots were sent out by Mr. Daniels, and in addition the article was reprinted in over two hundred magazines and newspapers. It has been translated into all written languages.

At the time Mr. Daniels was distributing the “Message to Garcia,” Prince Hilakoff, Director of Russian Railways, was in this country. He was the guest of the New York Central, and made a tour of the country under the personal direction of Mr. Daniels. The Prince saw the little book and was interested in it, more because Mr. Daniels was putting it out in such big numbers, probably, than otherwise.

In any event, when he got home he had the matter translated into Russian, and a copy of the booklet given to every railroad employee in Russia.

Other countries then took it up, and from Russia it passed into Germany, France, Spain, Turkey, Hindustan and China. During the war between Russia and Japan, every Russian soldier who went to the front was given a copy of the “Message to Garcia.”

The Japanese, finding the booklets in possession of the Russian prisoners, concluded that it must be a good thing, and accordingly translated it into Japanese.

And on an order of the Mikado, a copy was given to every man in the employ of the Japanese Government, soldier or civilian. Over forty million copies of “A Message to Garcia” have been printed.

This is said to be a larger circulation than any other literary venture has ever attained during the lifetime of the author, in all history–thanks to a series of lucky accidents!–E.H.

A MESSAGE TO GARCIA

As the cold of snow in the time of harvest, so is a faithful messenger to them that send him: for he refresheth the soul of his masters.–_Proverbs xxv:_ 13

In all this Cuban business there is one man stands out on the horizon of my memory like Mars at perihelion.

When war broke out between Spain and the United States, it was very necessary to communicate quickly with the leader of the Insurgents. Garcia was somewhere in the mountain fastnesses of Cuba–no one knew where. No mail or telegraph message could reach him. The President must secure his co-operation, and quickly. What to do!

Some one said to the President, “There is a fellow by the name of Rowan will find Garcia for you, if anybody can.”

Rowan was sent for and was given a letter to be delivered to Garcia. How “the fellow by the name of Rowan” took the letter, sealed it up in an oilskin pouch, strapped it over his heart, in four days landed by night off the coast of Cuba from an open boat, disappeared into the jungle, and in three weeks came out on the other side of the Island, having traversed a hostile country on foot, and delivered his letter to Garcia–are things I have no special desire now to tell in detail. The point that I wish to make is this: McKinley gave Rowan a letter to be delivered to Garcia; Rowan took the letter and did not ask, “Where is he at?” By the Eternal! there is a man whose form should be cast in deathless bronze and the statue placed in every college of the land. It is not book-learning young men need, nor instruction about this and that, but a stiffening of the vertebrae which will cause them to be loyal to a trust, to act promptly, concentrate their energies: do the thing–“Carry a message to Garcia.”  General Garcia is dead now, but there are other Garcias.

No man who has endeavored to carry out an enterprise where many hands were needed, but has been well-nigh appalled at times by the imbecility of the average man–the inability or unwillingness to concentrate on a thing and do it.

Slipshod assistance, foolish inattention, dowdy indifference, and half-hearted work seem the rule; and no man succeeds, unless by hook or crook or threat he forces or bribes other men to assist him; or mayhap, God in His goodness performs a miracle, and sends him an Angel of Light for an assistant. You, reader, put this matter to a test: You are sitting now in your office–six clerks are within call. Summon any one and make this request: “Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio.”

Will the clerk quietly say, “Yes, sir,” and go do the task?

On your life he will not. He will look at you out of a fishy eye andask one or more of the following questions:

Who was he?                         Which encyclopedia?                         Where is the encyclopedia?                         Was I hired for that?                         Don’t you mean Bismarck? What’s the matter with Charlie doing it?                         Is he dead?                         Is there any hurry?                         Shall I bring you the book and let you look it up yourself?                         What do you want to know for?

I wasn’t hired for that anyway!

And I will lay you ten to one that after you have answered the questions, and explained how to find the information, and why you want it, the clerk will go off and get one of the other clerks to help him try to find Garcia–and then come back and tell you there is no such man. Of course I may lose my bet, but according to the Law of Average I will not.

Now, if you are wise, you will not bother to explain to your “assistant” that Correggio is indexed under the C’s, not in the K’s, but you will smile very sweetly and say, “Never mind,” and go look it up yourself.

And this incapacity for independent action, this moral stupidity, this infirmity of the will, this unwillingness to cheerfully catch hold and lift–these are the things that put pure Socialism so far into the future. If men will not act for themselves, what will they do when the benefit of their effort is for all? A first mate with knotted club seems necessary; and the dread of getting “the bounce” Saturday night holds many a worker to his place.

Advertise for a stenographer, and nine out of ten who apply can neither spell nor punctuate–and do not think it necessary to.

Can such a one write a letter to Garcia?

“You see that bookkeeper,” said a foreman to me in a large factory.

“Yes; what about him?”

“Well, he’s a fine accountant, but if I’d send him up-town on an errand, he might accomplish the errand all right, and on the other hand, might stop at four saloons on the way, and when he got to Main Street would forget what he had been sent for.”

Can such a man be entrusted to carry a message to Garcia?

We have recently been hearing much maudlin sympathy expressed for the “downtrodden denizens of the sweat-shop” and the “homeless wanderer searching for honest employment,” and with it all often go many hard words for the men in power.

Nothing is said about the employer who grows old before his time in a vain attempt to get frowsy ne’er-do-wells to do intelligent work; and his long, patient striving with “help” that does nothing but loaf when his back is turned. In every store and factory there is a constant weeding-out process going on. The employer is continually sending away “help” that have shown their incapacity to further the interests of the business, and others are being taken on.

No matter how good times are, this sorting continues: only if times are hard and work is scarce, the sorting is done finer–but out and forever out the incompetent and unworthy go. It is the survival of the fittest. Self-interest prompts every employer to keep the best–those who can carry a message to Garcia.

I know one man of really brilliant parts who has not the ability to manage a business of his own, and yet who is absolutely worthless to any one else, because he carries with him constantly the insane suspicion that his employer is oppressing, or intending to oppress, him. He can not give orders; and he will not receive them. Should a message be given him to take to Garcia, his answer would probably be, “Take it yourself!”

Tonight this man walks the streets looking for work, the wind whistling through his threadbare coat. No one who knows him dare employ him, for he is a regular firebrand of discontent. He is impervious to reason, and the only thing that can impress him is the toe of a thick-soled Number Nine boot.

Of course I know that one so morally deformed is no less to be pitied than a physical cripple; but in our pitying let us drop a tear, too, for the men who are striving to carry on a great enterprise, whose working hours are not limited by the whistle, and whose hair is fast turning white through the struggle to hold in line dowdy indifference, slipshod imbecility, and the heartless ingratitude which, but for their enterprise, would be both hungry and homeless.

Have I put the matter too strongly? Possibly I have; but when all the world has gone a-slumming I wish to speak a word of sympathy for the man who succeeds–the man who, against great odds, has directed the efforts of others, and having succeeded, finds there’s nothing in it: nothing but bare board and clothes. I have carried a dinner-pail and worked for day’s wages, and I have also been an employer of labor, and I know there is something to be said on both sides. There is no excellence, per se, in poverty; rags are no recommendation; and all employers are not rapacious and high-handed, any more than all poor men are virtuous.

My heart goes out to the man who does his work when the “boss” is away, as well as when he is at home. And the man who, when given a letter for Garcia, quietly takes the missive, without asking any idiotic questions, and with no lurking intention of chucking it into the nearest sewer, or of doing aught else but deliver it, never gets “laid off,” nor has to go on a strike for higher wages. Civilization is one long, anxious search for just such individuals. Anything such a man asks shall be granted. His kind is so rare that no employer can afford to let him go. He is wanted in every city, town and village–in every office, shop, store and factory.

The world cries out for such: he is needed, and needed badly–the man who can carry A MESSAGE TO GARCIA.

To act in absolute freedom and at the same time know that responsibility is the price of freedom is salvation.

HERE THEN ENDETH THE PREACHMENT, _A MESSAGE TO GARCIA_, AS WRITTEN BY FRA ELBERTUS AND DONE INTO A BOOK BY THE ROYCROFTERS AT THEIR SHOP, WHICH IS IN EAST AURORA, NEW YORK.

LIFE IN ABUNDANCE

The supreme prayer of my heart is not to be learned or “good,” but to be Radiant.

I desire to radiate health, cheerfulness, sincerity, calm courage and good-will.

I wish to be simple, honest, natural, frank, clean in mind and clean in body, unaffected–ready to say, “I do not know,” if so it be, to meet all men on an absolute equality–to face any obstacle and meet every difficulty unafraid and unabashed.

I wish others to live their lives, too, up to their highest, fullest and best. To that end I pray that I may never meddle, dictate, interfere, give advice that is not wanted, nor assist when my services are not needed. If I can help people I’ll do it by giving them a chance to help themselves; and if I can uplift or inspire, let it be by example, inference and suggestion, rather than by injunction and dictation. That is to say, I desire to be Radiant–to Radiate Life.

The final two pages of another Hubbard manuscript differing slightly in content from that held in the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library are housed in the Roycroft Arts Museum in East Aurora, New York.

Original Manuscript

Elbert Hubbard’s original 1899 essay, written in pencil, is housed in the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library in Buffalo, New York.  It is accompanied by the following letter of consignment:

June 5th, 1900

Walter L. Brown                         Buffalo, NY

My Dear Mr. Brown:

Among written articles there are very few, I am told, that attain the circulation awarded to “A Message to Garcia.” Within ten months it has been reprinted over nine million times. I grant you that this alone is no proof of literary excellence; but the fact may be of value to the Zulu who shall sit on the broken buttress of Niagara Bridge, in shedding light on the mental qualities of those who lived in the year Eighteen Hundred + Ninety-Nine.

Thinking the original Ms. of the article named may be of some slight value, I have had it appropriately bound + beg to hand it to you herewith, with the request that you present it to the Buffalo Public Library and believe me ever with high regard.

Your sincere                         Elbert Hubbard

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Coming Apart or Community Together?

Posted by Brandon Dillon on March 15, 2012

Coming Apart or Community Together?.

This is another Great Blog and new book coming out talking about how the Founding Fathers were right! listen to this.

Although many believe that the complex challenges facing us today cannot be solved through the lens of the American founder’s virtues, Murray writes:

I take another view: The founders were right. The success of America depended on virtue in the people when the country began and it still does in the twenty-first century. America will remain exceptional only to the extent that its people embody the same qualities that made it work for the first two centuries of its existence. The founding virtues are central to that that kind of citizenry.

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Men’s Leadership

Posted by Brandon Dillon on February 10, 2012

For Men Only, not women and not males, but MEN!

This is an amazing event where the top in leadership come to speak and inspire and motivate and educate us on all kinds of topics. But the format is leadership and growing your leadership ability in your home, your business, your job, your church your community, your groups and organization’s. Everything rises and falls on Leadership

Listen to Hugo Grotius a 17th Century Dutch Scholar

“He knows not how to rule a kingdom, that cannot manage a Province; nor can he wield a Province, that cannot order a City; nor he order a City, that knows not how to regulate a Village; nor he a Village that cannot guide a Family; nor can that man Govern well a family that knows not how to Govern himself; neither can any Govern himself unless Reason be Lord, Will and Appetite her Vassals; nor can Reason rule unless herself be ruled by God, and (wholly) be obedient to Him.”

So it all starts with us. if we can not govern our selves we are not fit to govern anyone else. That why leadership is so Vital and why we see the problems we are seeing in our great country, and why we are slipping every day from the top of the freedom list. We are now #8 in the worlds most free countries. We used to be number 1 and the reason for that is a lack of leadership in its citizens.

I hope to see you there , if you need a ticket or want a ride let me know if not just meet me there and we will have some fun!

Men’s Leadership

8:00p Friday, February 10, 2012

Shriners Center- Silver Garden Auditorium

24350 Southfield Rd.

Southfield, Mi 48075

248-569-2900

 

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